The yellow witches" broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region

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Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station , Ogden, Utah
Fir, Rust fungi, Diseases and
StatementJames L. Mielke
SeriesResearch note / Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service -- no. 47, Research note (Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)) -- no. 47.
ContributionsIntermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
The Physical Object
Pagination5 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25580022M
OCLC/WorldCa681407582

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. The yellow witches' broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region Item Preview remove-circle The yellow witches' broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region by Mielke, Pages: The yellow witches\u27 broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region / By James L.

Mielke and Utah) Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden Cite. The yellow witches\u27 broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region / By James L. Mielke and Utah) Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden Abstract.

Spruce broom rust or yellow witches' broom rust is a fungal plant disease caused by the basidiomycete fungus known as Chrysomyxa occurs exclusively in North America, with the most concentrated outbreaks occurring in northern Arizona and southern Colorado on blue and Engelmann spruce, as well as in Alaska on black and white spruce.

This disease alternates its life cycle between Family: Coleosporiaceae. Abstract. There are about 50 species of Abies, but in Britain only one, A.

grandis, has shown marked promise as a forest is a very high yielding species, and shows considerable resistance to attack by Heterobasidion annosum (Fomes annosus).The quality of the timber is relatively low, however, and so far A.

grandis has remained only a minor species in British : D H Phillips, D A Burdekin.

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conspicuous yellow witches brooms on fir. Primary Host: Grand fir and subalpine fir All firs (Abies sp.) are susceptible. Alternate host: Chickweeds, Stellaria. spp., and. Cerastium. spp. Damage. Although mortality is rare, this disease may cause some growth loss and localized volume loss as well as reduced value of infected ornamental trees.

The Yellow Witches' broom of subalpine fir in the Intermountain Region MIELKE, J. L., The Yellow Witches' broom of subalpine fir in the Intermountain Region. J., Important F. Type Concept: This community is found in northern Arizona, central New Mexico and possibly Utah between and m (, feet) elevation on moderately steep west- and south-facing slopes.

Soils are derived from volcanics. Climate is relatively cool and dry. Abies lasiocarpa and Picea engelmannii are the major climax tsuga menziesii, Pinus strobiformis, and Populus. This is very different than the flat sprays of true fir or the needle-like tips of spruce.

Description The yellow witches" broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region FB2

Douglas fir buds. Douglas fir new growth. True Fir or Abies spp. There are many firs in our region including Pacific silver fir, grand fir, noble fir, and in the high country, subalpine fir.

All true firs have cones that are erect. The yellow witches' broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region View Metadata By: Mielke, James L. - Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah). Chemical analysis of balsam fir browse during the growing season varied according to color as follows: (percent composition on dry matter basis) foliage color protein fat fiber ash N-free Mg K Extract very yellow yellow light green If the witches' broom is caused by a genetic mutation, there will likely only be one cluster of twigs in the tree.

Conifer trees, such as pine, fir, spruce and juniper, might be affected by a genetic mutation that causes witches' broom. Witches brooms are formed on infected branches. Growth loss may occur under conditions of severe infection. Form is sometimes affected by large brooms.

Identification. Dense witches brooms with stunted, yellow needles readily identify these diseases (fig. 83). The needles are shed in fall, giving the broom the appearance of being dead during. The number one Halloween costume for at least the last five years has been a witch.

Aside from the pointy hat, the most recognizable accessory for any witch is her trusty broom. The image of a. Indeed, in a issue of Science Magazine, Linnda Caporael suggested that violent muscle spasms, shaking, vomiting, delusions, hallucinations, and creepy-crawly sensations on the skin’s surface—all toxic effects of ergotism—were documented in records of the Salem witch trials, and may have been caused by fungus-tainted food.

Related story from us: Inthe eerie end-of-the-world. No one knows exactly why witches were associated with with flying brooms. But the trope is remarkably persistent. The witch is the perennial favorite in Halloween costume popularity rankings, and she always carries a broom, generally a twiggy bundle with a handle that doesn’t look like it would do much for a floor.

Type Concept: This forested association occurs in southern Idaho, southern Montana, western Wyoming, central and southern Utah, and through the Colorado mountains. This association is found between m (, feet) elevation.

It occurs on plateaus, benchlands, and slopes ranging from gentle to very steep but is normally on cold northwest to northeast aspects. Fir broom rust (Melampsorella caryophyllacearum) causes dense witches brooms with stunted yellow needles, and can damage tree growth by reducing crown development.

Mortality is less common in mature trees than in the younger regeneration trees. The infected branch sheds its needles in fall leaving a barren dead looking branch.

The yellow witches broom of subalpine fir in the intermountain region - Thursday, May 7, AM Art of Public Speaking - Wednesday, May 6, PM Debussy Estampes Urtext - Thursday, AM.

Picea pungens Engelm. Blue Spruce. Pinaceae -- Pine family. Gilbert H. Fechner. Blue spruce (Picea pungens) is also called Colorado blue spruce, Colorado spruce, silver spruce, and pino real.

It is a slow-growing, long-lived tree of medium size that, because of its symmetry and color, is. • mountain hemlock • Pacific silver fir • noble fir • subalpine fir • whitebark pine: Ave = - m (20 - 30 ft) Max = m (50 ft) Coincides with host tree ranges in Oregon, infrequently occurring in Washington: Effects are usually minor until hosts are older than years of age.

Subalpine fir and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) are common arborescent associates. A similar Pacific silver fir-mountain hemlock/beargrass association is found in Oregon (20). The extensive pure or nearly pure mountain hemlock forests in the high Cascades of Oregon are primarily in the mountain hemlock/grouse whortleberry community (38,42,48,72).

Juniperus communis, the common juniper—also known as ground juniper (although ground juniper is often classified as var. depress)—is a wide-ranging shrub or small tree in the Cupressaceae (cypress family) native to cool temperate areas in the Northern Hemisphere, and may have one of the widest distributions of any woody plant.

Kinnikinnick is a host to yellow witch's broom, which also affects three species of spruce (Picea spp.) in Alberta. Kinnikinnick's sensitivity to herbicides varies from susceptible to intermediate resistance, depending on both the type of treatment and the life stage treated [9,13].

ECOSYSTEMS: FRES10 White - red - jack pine FRES11 Spruce - fir FRES13 Loblolly - shortleaf pine FRES19 Aspen - birch FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES21 Ponderosa pine FRES22 Western white pine FRES23 Fir - spruce FRES25 Larch FRES26 Lodgepole pine FRES28 Western hardwoods FRES29 Sagebrush FRES34 Chaparral - mountain shrub FRES36 Mountain grasslands.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk.

Software. An illustration of two photographs. Images. An illustration of a heart shape Donate. An illustration of text ellipses. Yellow witches' broom (Melampsorella caryophyllacearum), which caused drying of uludag fir trees, was determined.

Besides, 53 macrofungi species belonging to 3 divisions, 10 orders, 25 families. This Halloween, many of those dressed as witches will be carrying broomsticks. But few likely know the shadowy tale of how witches came to be. Field guide contains descriptions and color photographs of diseases, insect pests, animal and abiotic damages common on forest conifers in the northern and central Rocky Mountains.

Diagnostic keys, comparative tables, line drawings, and indices by host and subject aid in the identification of damaging agents. Book is organized in color coded sections according to the part of the tree affected. Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.)Carr.

Mountain Hemlock. Pinaceae -- Pine family. Joseph E.

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Means. Mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) is usually found on cold, snowy subalpine sites where it grows slowly, sometimes attaining more than years in age. Arborescent individuals that have narrowly conical crowns until old age ( to years) and shrubby krummholz on cold, windy sites near timberline.

Facts About Pine Trees. Pine trees (Pinus spp.) are the most common coniferous tree worldwide, numbering around species. These trees form large forests characterized by wide open areas with.• Pacific silver fir • noble fir • subalpine fir • whitebark pine: Ave = - m (20 - 30 ft) Max = m (50 ft) Coincides with host tree ranges in Oregon, infrequently occurring in Washington: Effects are usually minor until hosts are older than years of age.On gentle slopes trees can be found on deeper soil profiles; where Baker cypress is associated with red fir, a good humic layer of dark brown soil exists.

Baker cypress is generally found at elevations from 3, to 7, feet (1, m) on north- to northeast-facing slopes [ 5, 29 ].